AKA: William George
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
konicaiii on Flickr.
Always tell yourself the following at all times; “It’s not the camera, it’s me. I’m the one sets the setting or chooses the film. I’m the one who composes. I’m the one who zooms. I’m the one who picks the subjects. The camera is just the tool I do it with. Some are better built than others but when all is said and done: It’s not the camera, it’s me.” And this way you won’t be a gear asshole. Except if it’s broken. Then it’s the camera, not you. Unless you broke it. Why don’t you treat your gear better? That shit is expensive.

konicaiii on Flickr.

Always tell yourself the following at all times;

“It’s not the camera, it’s me. I’m the one sets the setting or chooses the film. I’m the one who composes. I’m the one who zooms. I’m the one who picks the subjects. The camera is just the tool I do it with. Some are better built than others but when all is said and done: It’s not the camera, it’s me.” And this way you won’t be a gear asshole.

Except if it’s broken. Then it’s the camera, not you.

Unless you broke it. Why don’t you treat your gear better? That shit is expensive.

People waiting for the trolley in Kagoshima, Japan. This was the day before I left for Tokyo, and then Canada, and was thus one of my final photos of Kyushu. 
I always liked Kagoshima. Big enough to be a fairly jumping place, but small enough that getting around was easy. It’d be perfect for someone who likes cities, but hates being stuck in the hellish crowds that bigger cities can have. 
The main downside is the constantly active Sakurajima. Having that ash regularly blow on you seems like it’d be highly annoying within a short time. Probably with the first ruined laundry you hung out. I was about forty kilometers away from the thing and I regularly got dusted when the wind was blowing right. Nasty oily ash on top of that. Took forever to get it off one of my lenses.
I’ve been looking at 16:9 and 2.35:1 aspect ratios lately for a comic idea. The above isn’t either but I felt wide was the way to go with this one since there’s even more empty space in the bits you don’t see. But for some reason it doesn’t seem natural I think it’s because most photography fits in the 4:3, 3:2 aspect ratio and you’re just not used to it. And since I’ve spent a lot of time working with 6:6/ square aspect where you can get away with framing stuff right in the middle, this seems even further off for me. 
The trick seems to be to try and compose things so the subject doesn’t seem so small within the frame. Something to practice, I guess.

People waiting for the trolley in Kagoshima, Japan. This was the day before I left for Tokyo, and then Canada, and was thus one of my final photos of Kyushu. 

I always liked Kagoshima. Big enough to be a fairly jumping place, but small enough that getting around was easy. It’d be perfect for someone who likes cities, but hates being stuck in the hellish crowds that bigger cities can have. 

The main downside is the constantly active Sakurajima. Having that ash regularly blow on you seems like it’d be highly annoying within a short time. Probably with the first ruined laundry you hung out. I was about forty kilometers away from the thing and I regularly got dusted when the wind was blowing right. Nasty oily ash on top of that. Took forever to get it off one of my lenses.

I’ve been looking at 16:9 and 2.35:1 aspect ratios lately for a comic idea. The above isn’t either but I felt wide was the way to go with this one since there’s even more empty space in the bits you don’t see. But for some reason it doesn’t seem natural I think it’s because most photography fits in the 4:3, 3:2 aspect ratio and you’re just not used to it. And since I’ve spent a lot of time working with 6:6/ square aspect where you can get away with framing stuff right in the middle, this seems even further off for me. 

The trick seems to be to try and compose things so the subject doesn’t seem so small within the frame. Something to practice, I guess.

My current state of camera ownership. From left to right: Olympus Pen EP-3 with the 14-42mm and 17mm kit lenses and the 45mm. The Pentax KX with the 28mm, 200mm telephoto, and 55mm on the body. With a Vivitar flash and a pile of filters. And the Konica III rangefinder with the 48mm lens built in to the body.
The Pen gets the most use. I did run a roll through the Pentax but it’ll be another two weeks before I can get those back. And the Konica’s rangefinder is off and will cost me more than I can currently afford to get it fixed.

My current state of camera ownership. From left to right: Olympus Pen EP-3 with the 14-42mm and 17mm kit lenses and the 45mm. The Pentax KX with the 28mm, 200mm telephoto, and 55mm on the body. With a Vivitar flash and a pile of filters. And the Konica III rangefinder with the 48mm lens built in to the body.

The Pen gets the most use. I did run a roll through the Pentax but it’ll be another two weeks before I can get those back. And the Konica’s rangefinder is off and will cost me more than I can currently afford to get it fixed.

The latest wave leaves from Yurakucho Station in Tokyo to places unknown.
I’m pretty sure this was shot from the hip with my Konica III. What you see here was at about a twenty degree angle on the roll. I don’t think it was an accidental shot, but I’m willing to accept that possibility since the Konica III has a hair trigger. I decided to post it because I liked the path of light that went down the middle.

The latest wave leaves from Yurakucho Station in Tokyo to places unknown.

I’m pretty sure this was shot from the hip with my Konica III. What you see here was at about a twenty degree angle on the roll. I don’t think it was an accidental shot, but I’m willing to accept that possibility since the Konica III has a hair trigger. I decided to post it because I liked the path of light that went down the middle.

Another Bill, who we will call Tokyo Bill because it sounds sexy, took me to the Yanaka area of Tokyo to visit the famous graveyard kitties and the Ginza. That’s where I ran into the young photographer a few posts down.
There is a skill to photographing people in a crowd that I have yet to develop fully. And one of the problems I found while trying to do it in Halifax is the lack of crowds. With a crowd you can at least make like you’re photographing something else when you get unpleasant looks. With everyone in Halifax being afraid (Of being mocked, insulted, of not being seen as cool nor special, etc…) pointing your camera at people gets you nothing but glares. I’ll try again next time I’m down. Maybe after I get through with the medical probing and prodding to find out what’s wrong with my guts.
I converted the shot to B&W because the Pen was set to “vivid” in it’s color balance and her shirt turned everything into a sickly orange. It’s a handy little camera, but since a lot is tucked away in a menu I find I need to be far more mindful than with a film camera.
Speaking of film cameras: My beautiful Konica III has had its rangefinder knocked off focus during my travels. Mostly it’s off on the vertical axis, but there’s a bit of deviation from the horizontal as well. There might be someone who can fix it up for me, but I’m assuming it’ll cost me more to fix it than I paid for it to begin with.

Another Bill, who we will call Tokyo Bill because it sounds sexy, took me to the Yanaka area of Tokyo to visit the famous graveyard kitties and the Ginza. That’s where I ran into the young photographer a few posts down.

There is a skill to photographing people in a crowd that I have yet to develop fully. And one of the problems I found while trying to do it in Halifax is the lack of crowds. With a crowd you can at least make like you’re photographing something else when you get unpleasant looks. With everyone in Halifax being afraid (Of being mocked, insulted, of not being seen as cool nor special, etc…) pointing your camera at people gets you nothing but glares. I’ll try again next time I’m down. Maybe after I get through with the medical probing and prodding to find out what’s wrong with my guts.

I converted the shot to B&W because the Pen was set to “vivid” in it’s color balance and her shirt turned everything into a sickly orange. It’s a handy little camera, but since a lot is tucked away in a menu I find I need to be far more mindful than with a film camera.

Speaking of film cameras: My beautiful Konica III has had its rangefinder knocked off focus during my travels. Mostly it’s off on the vertical axis, but there’s a bit of deviation from the horizontal as well. There might be someone who can fix it up for me, but I’m assuming it’ll cost me more to fix it than I paid for it to begin with.