AKA: William George
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Brelly on Flickr.
One of my new students showing off her stylish umbrella before heading out. Pentax KX. Scan of a print. I’m going to have to look in other parts of Gunsan, but film seems limited to Fujicolor C200 and the vastly over-priced Instax line. In limited amounts. Having to wait a week for my developing to be sent off to Seoul isn’t too bad given how much cheaper it is compared to Canada. Not compared to Japan though. Japan is half of what it costs in Korea. A third of Canada. It’s almost like they want me to buy a new DSLR or something. Which, when I do so, will probably be a Pentax to go with my collection of lenses.

Brelly on Flickr.

One of my new students showing off her stylish umbrella before heading out. Pentax KX. Scan of a print.

I’m going to have to look in other parts of Gunsan, but film seems limited to Fujicolor C200 and the vastly over-priced Instax line. In limited amounts. Having to wait a week for my developing to be sent off to Seoul isn’t too bad given how much cheaper it is compared to Canada.

Not compared to Japan though. Japan is half of what it costs in Korea. A third of Canada. It’s almost like they want me to buy a new DSLR or something. Which, when I do so, will probably be a Pentax to go with my collection of lenses.

ready to go on Flickr.
This is probably no surprise to anyone who is familiar with Asian pop culture, but kids clean up the classroom after school. Just the really basic stuff. Sweeping and organizing the desks. Sometimes the mopping as well. In this case, mopping is more racing across the room three times pushing a wet cloth ahead of them. The janitor/ groundskeeper takes care of everything else. There did seem to be a class distinction though. In the richer areas the kids would not clean up, and if they did it was done with some very open anger and resentment. That sort of thing is for The Poors to do. A lot of ESL companies would force the cleaning upon the teachers because the was no way they were going to make the cash cow unhappy by making it pick up a dirty piece of paper. The teachers would resent it because they all came from a relatively wealthy nation and that sort of thing was for The Poors to do. Of course, we don’t call them The Poors. We call them The Cleaning Staff. We don’t notice them until we need to walk around them.

ready to go on Flickr.

This is probably no surprise to anyone who is familiar with Asian pop culture, but kids clean up the classroom after school. Just the really basic stuff. Sweeping and organizing the desks. Sometimes the mopping as well. In this case, mopping is more racing across the room three times pushing a wet cloth ahead of them. The janitor/ groundskeeper takes care of everything else.

There did seem to be a class distinction though. In the richer areas the kids would not clean up, and if they did it was done with some very open anger and resentment. That sort of thing is for The Poors to do. A lot of ESL companies would force the cleaning upon the teachers because the was no way they were going to make the cash cow unhappy by making it pick up a dirty piece of paper. The teachers would resent it because they all came from a relatively wealthy nation and that sort of thing was for The Poors to do.

Of course, we don’t call them The Poors. We call them The Cleaning Staff. We don’t notice them until we need to walk around them.

snowdog on Flickr.
I view pets in the same way I view children and lovers: They’re great when someone else has to take care of them.
Not that they lack their charms. I just find all three groups draining after a while and need my Me Time to rebalance. I don’t envy parents in any way, shape, or form. And I salute them for being willing to put in the time and effort to (hopefully) make better human beings than they are. May Superman grant you all his blessings.
As for pets: Screw all that poop-scooping and fur covering everything you own.
Lovers? I shall say no more.

snowdog on Flickr.

I view pets in the same way I view children and lovers: They’re great when someone else has to take care of them.

Not that they lack their charms. I just find all three groups draining after a while and need my Me Time to rebalance. I don’t envy parents in any way, shape, or form. And I salute them for being willing to put in the time and effort to (hopefully) make better human beings than they are. May Superman grant you all his blessings.

As for pets: Screw all that poop-scooping and fur covering everything you own.

Lovers? I shall say no more.

shot43 on Flickr.
Along with the regular preschool and elementary students you get in Japanese ESL classes, I also taught English to kids who couldn’t speak Japanese. Or any language for that matter. Most of them couldn’t even walk yet. That’s right, babies. He was part of the daycare center that was the sister company to the Eikaiwa that I was working for. Same owners up top. As exhausting as it was, since these classes were first thing in the morning and I was still waiting for the coffee to kick in, in retrospect I think I liked these classes the best. I mean, come on. It’s playing (structured games) with babies. You’d have to be pretty dead inside to find that a negative. And man, did they love that ABC song. If I had to speak ill of it, it was that they took in far more kids than they could give attention to. None of this is the fault of the fine ladies, and sole gent, working there. In the end it’s a business and as far as any businessman is concerned profit is king.To say the employees were swamped is an understatement. With a couple of exceptions, none of the staff lasted beyond six months.  I hated pointing out that so and so had a wet diaper because I felt like I was trying to tell them how to do their job. But I see caretaking as an unending sort of thing and if the boss has two staff out front handing out fliers to drum up more business, that’s two staff who aren’t making sure bottoms are dry. Let me be clear: It’s not like these kids were crawling around in their own filth like some sort of Dickensian orphanage. The staff did their best as fast as they could. But they could only do so much when the owner a thousand kilometers away in Osaka tries to improve things by making their jobs more difficult.  Such is employment everywhere, I guess.

shot43 on Flickr.

Along with the regular preschool and elementary students you get in Japanese ESL classes, I also taught English to kids who couldn’t speak Japanese. Or any language for that matter. Most of them couldn’t even walk yet. That’s right, babies.

He was part of the daycare center that was the sister company to the Eikaiwa that I was working for. Same owners up top. As exhausting as it was, since these classes were first thing in the morning and I was still waiting for the coffee to kick in, in retrospect I think I liked these classes the best. I mean, come on. It’s playing (structured games) with babies. You’d have to be pretty dead inside to find that a negative.

And man, did they love that ABC song.

If I had to speak ill of it, it was that they took in far more kids than they could give attention to. None of this is the fault of the fine ladies, and sole gent, working there. In the end it’s a business and as far as any businessman is concerned profit is king.To say the employees were swamped is an understatement. With a couple of exceptions, none of the staff lasted beyond six months.

I hated pointing out that so and so had a wet diaper because I felt like I was trying to tell them how to do their job. But I see caretaking as an unending sort of thing and if the boss has two staff out front handing out fliers to drum up more business, that’s two staff who aren’t making sure bottoms are dry.

Let me be clear: It’s not like these kids were crawling around in their own filth like some sort of Dickensian orphanage. The staff did their best as fast as they could. But they could only do so much when the owner a thousand kilometers away in Osaka tries to improve things by making their jobs more difficult.

Such is employment everywhere, I guess.