AKA: William George
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
ho-tel mo-tel holiday innn on Flickr.
It looks like the start of something sleazy, doesn’t it? But it’s just a weekend out in Fukuoka at a well-respected hotel. I guess something sleazy could have happened, but I’m the sort of guy for whom sleaze is hard to come by and I’m too lazy to put in the extra effort I need more than everyone else.
I’ve stayed in a lot of hotels over the years. The worst ones were in Korea’s love hotels. You could always tell the places that had a lot of working girls coming and out of it. Bad lighting, big TVs, threadbare carpets. I found a syringe over the door in one once. That was fun. Okay, no it wasn’t. I barely got any sleep because I was worried that I was going to wake up to a junkie busting in to get his stash. As an aside, there are a lot of syringe collection boxes in the public washrooms here in Halifax. They’re always near full. That’s both depressing and unsurprising. Japanese business hotels are pretty uniform. Some slight variations. I’ve seen a few attempts to fit two beds into a room built for one. But they’re always Spartan due to the fact that people were usually in them just to sleep. The only time I experienced anything like the hooker-hubs of Korea was the final hotel I stayed in in Shinjuku.  At least I assume that’s what the $100, midnight to six a.m. “massages” were all about.

ho-tel mo-tel holiday innn on Flickr.

It looks like the start of something sleazy, doesn’t it? But it’s just a weekend out in Fukuoka at a well-respected hotel. I guess something sleazy could have happened, but I’m the sort of guy for whom sleaze is hard to come by and I’m too lazy to put in the extra effort I need more than everyone else.

I’ve stayed in a lot of hotels over the years. The worst ones were in Korea’s love hotels. You could always tell the places that had a lot of working girls coming and out of it. Bad lighting, big TVs, threadbare carpets. I found a syringe over the door in one once. That was fun. Okay, no it wasn’t. I barely got any sleep because I was worried that I was going to wake up to a junkie busting in to get his stash.

As an aside, there are a lot of syringe collection boxes in the public washrooms here in Halifax. They’re always near full. That’s both depressing and unsurprising.

Japanese business hotels are pretty uniform. Some slight variations. I’ve seen a few attempts to fit two beds into a room built for one. But they’re always Spartan due to the fact that people were usually in them just to sleep. The only time I experienced anything like the hooker-hubs of Korea was the final hotel I stayed in in Shinjuku.

At least I assume that’s what the $100, midnight to six a.m. “massages” were all about.

IMG_1896 on Flickr.
I’m gonna write a few hundred words about cheap hotels in east Asia now! Unless you’re loaded down with disposable income because you’re in a big corporation or in the JET Programme, your trips across the region will see you in a low cost business hotel of some sort. Short of going there and scoping them out ahead of time, there’s no way to know how they really are until you get there. It’s not like they’re going to have “Centipede free since April!” on the brochures.  All of the business hotels I’ve stayed in in Taiwan were lovely places. Costs there are generally pretty cheap as it is, but I was expecting these hole in the walls and wound up with a hotel room that would have made for an excellent apartment to rent. I could have held a party in the bathroom of the one in Taipei I stayed at.  Japanese business hotels are like looking at photos of someone as they age. They’re all the same more or less. But the age/ use of the hotel shows around the corners like the lines growing on your eyes.  The recently renovated JR Kyushu Hotel Kagoshima was the dashing youth, hip to the wifi the kids were into. All sleek and shiny with an eager to please staff. The hotel in Fukuoka from which I took this photo, Nishitetsu Grand Hotel, was like someone in their 30s or 40s: A lot of the roughness had been smoothed away leaving a responsible competence behind. The staff were lovely and super helpful.  The hotel I stayed in in Shinjuku before I left Japan was like the kind but doddering granny who offers you a butterscotch to suck on and can’t remember which grandkid you are. The staff accepted that I was there. I found Korea to be really hit or miss. For the most part you will get a very spartan sleeping space with a lobby that looks more like the entrance to a hospital. You will also get business hotels that, despite the label on the brochure, charge by the hour and are more geared towards giving the local hookers a place to operate from. Those places aren’t always sleazy looking, though. Sometimes they can be quite nice. But since hotels tend to be clustered twenty to a block, they need to bring in the cash somehow. Once I stayed in a Korean love motel in Seoul. It seemed pretty clean and spacious. And then I found the uncapped hypodermic needle on the ledge above the door. Unfortunately, it was around 2a.m. when I found it and I wasn’t going to have much luck finding a new spot to sleep. I set the alarm for shortly after dawn and left for the train back home without showering. I was afraid of what I’d find in the towel rack. One of my many peculiarities is that I rate hotels by the view out the window. If I base my many stays on that alone, the above mentioned palace in Taipei would be the top since it directly faced the Taipei 101 building, giving me a fabulous scene both day and night. And while the parking lot view in the Comfort Inn near Toronto Pearson Airport  didn’t help it’s case, the brick wall I had in Shinjuku “won”. I was luckier than the bastards across the hall. Their windows opened up to the laundry room.

IMG_1896 on Flickr.

I’m gonna write a few hundred words about cheap hotels in east Asia now!

Unless you’re loaded down with disposable income because you’re in a big corporation or in the JET Programme, your trips across the region will see you in a low cost business hotel of some sort. Short of going there and scoping them out ahead of time, there’s no way to know how they really are until you get there. It’s not like they’re going to have “Centipede free since April!” on the brochures. 

All of the business hotels I’ve stayed in in Taiwan were lovely places. Costs there are generally pretty cheap as it is, but I was expecting these hole in the walls and wound up with a hotel room that would have made for an excellent apartment to rent. I could have held a party in the bathroom of the one in Taipei I stayed at.

Japanese business hotels are like looking at photos of someone as they age. They’re all the same more or less. But the age/ use of the hotel shows around the corners like the lines growing on your eyes.

The recently renovated JR Kyushu Hotel Kagoshima was the dashing youth, hip to the wifi the kids were into. All sleek and shiny with an eager to please staff. The hotel in Fukuoka from which I took this photo, Nishitetsu Grand Hotel, was like someone in their 30s or 40s: A lot of the roughness had been smoothed away leaving a responsible competence behind. The staff were lovely and super helpful.

The hotel I stayed in in Shinjuku before I left Japan was like the kind but doddering granny who offers you a butterscotch to suck on and can’t remember which grandkid you are. The staff accepted that I was there.

I found Korea to be really hit or miss. For the most part you will get a very spartan sleeping space with a lobby that looks more like the entrance to a hospital. You will also get business hotels that, despite the label on the brochure, charge by the hour and are more geared towards giving the local hookers a place to operate from. Those places aren’t always sleazy looking, though. Sometimes they can be quite nice. But since hotels tend to be clustered twenty to a block, they need to bring in the cash somehow.

Once I stayed in a Korean love motel in Seoul. It seemed pretty clean and spacious. And then I found the uncapped hypodermic needle on the ledge above the door. Unfortunately, it was around 2a.m. when I found it and I wasn’t going to have much luck finding a new spot to sleep. I set the alarm for shortly after dawn and left for the train back home without showering. I was afraid of what I’d find in the towel rack.

One of my many peculiarities is that I rate hotels by the view out the window. If I base my many stays on that alone, the above mentioned palace in Taipei would be the top since it directly faced the Taipei 101 building, giving me a fabulous scene both day and night. And while the parking lot view in the Comfort Inn near Toronto Pearson Airport  didn’t help it’s case, the brick wall I had in Shinjuku “won”.

I was luckier than the bastards across the hall. Their windows opened up to the laundry room.