AKA: William George
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
img_1035 on Flickr.
Unlike every single job I had in Korea and Canada, the sole job I had in Japan gave me training in their methodology. I’d like to point out the words “sole job” in that sentence so you may understand that I was in Japan almost as long as I was in Korea and yet only worked a single job there. It was six in Korea. I’m not saying that getting actual training made me a better employee, but… okay, I am saying that. And while employers not doing so makes sense in the fly-by-night world of ESL in Korea, Canadian companies have little excuse. Anyway, my spot in Japan was a bit unusual for ESL there. Everyone is pretty much farmed out to local kindergartens and elementary schools in addition to their place of employment right off the bat. I spent the first year just working in the eikaiwa and while I had been trained for that, it wasn’t until later that I started going to kindergartens and that needed a whole different set of training. I had to go to Kumamoto for that and that’s where I took this photo. The graveyard was down the street from the regional HQ towards the lovely tram system they have there.  The sunset and the graves were irresistible and I sat there until the sun went down trying to capture both.

img_1035 on Flickr.

Unlike every single job I had in Korea and Canada, the sole job I had in Japan gave me training in their methodology.

I’d like to point out the words “sole job” in that sentence so you may understand that I was in Japan almost as long as I was in Korea and yet only worked a single job there. It was six in Korea. I’m not saying that getting actual training made me a better employee, but… okay, I am saying that. And while employers not doing so makes sense in the fly-by-night world of ESL in Korea, Canadian companies have little excuse.

Anyway, my spot in Japan was a bit unusual for ESL there. Everyone is pretty much farmed out to local kindergartens and elementary schools in addition to their place of employment right off the bat. I spent the first year just working in the eikaiwa and while I had been trained for that, it wasn’t until later that I started going to kindergartens and that needed a whole different set of training. I had to go to Kumamoto for that and that’s where I took this photo. The graveyard was down the street from the regional HQ towards the lovely tram system they have there.

The sunset and the graves were irresistible and I sat there until the sun went down trying to capture both.