Ah, back when photography was new and exciting and I was doing all of the things first semester photography students do. 
Ah, back when Japan was new and exciting and I was doing all of the things new arrivals with no money or internet but enough cash to develop film do.
This one of many uncountable small Shinto shrines that dot the countryside of Japan. They’re great sources of cooling shade during the summers here. It was shot with a Holga WPC120 camera. I was always unsatisfied with my ability to get the timing right on the manual shutter. And with 120 film steadily getting rarer and more expensive to develop, I couldn’t really bring myself to use it more often. I did like it though. Real primitive Ur photography type of stuff.
It’s funny how quickly things changed here. 120 film wasn’t too hard to come by even though it was slightly pricey and took a few days to a week to get processed when I arrived five years ago. Now I’d have to buy the film online from a different country, or travel to a big city like Fukuoka, Osaka, and Tokyo. Even in the big camera stores in those places film takes up less and less shelf space. And I’ve only ever seen old fellers in those sections. The times they are a changin’, as the old song tells us.
Assuming my friend Grace didn’t eat my WPC120 in the years between my return to Halifax this summer and when I loaned the camera to him (he lives in Dartmouth, yo), I might get it back and convert the spools to hold 135 film. That’s also getting hard to buy and use, but it might have a year or two left to it.

Ah, back when photography was new and exciting and I was doing all of the things first semester photography students do. 

Ah, back when Japan was new and exciting and I was doing all of the things new arrivals with no money or internet but enough cash to develop film do.

This one of many uncountable small Shinto shrines that dot the countryside of Japan. They’re great sources of cooling shade during the summers here. It was shot with a Holga WPC120 camera. I was always unsatisfied with my ability to get the timing right on the manual shutter. And with 120 film steadily getting rarer and more expensive to develop, I couldn’t really bring myself to use it more often. I did like it though. Real primitive Ur photography type of stuff.

It’s funny how quickly things changed here. 120 film wasn’t too hard to come by even though it was slightly pricey and took a few days to a week to get processed when I arrived five years ago. Now I’d have to buy the film online from a different country, or travel to a big city like Fukuoka, Osaka, and Tokyo. Even in the big camera stores in those places film takes up less and less shelf space. And I’ve only ever seen old fellers in those sections. The times they are a changin’, as the old song tells us.

Assuming my friend Grace didn’t eat my WPC120 in the years between my return to Halifax this summer and when I loaned the camera to him (he lives in Dartmouth, yo), I might get it back and convert the spools to hold 135 film. That’s also getting hard to buy and use, but it might have a year or two left to it.