AKA: William George
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Did you re-delete the re-uploaded Bang Barstal archive because you no longer feel comfortable associating it with yourself? Or just because you felt no one's interested? (I actually miss it quite a bit, and feel sad that I missed a second chance to see it again, but if it's for the first reason, then I can understand.)

Hey there. Glad you liked it.

It’s the first reason. It’s not so much Bang Barstal itself, though there is a lot about it that makes me cringe. The medium in general has been the source of far more frustration than pride for me for far too long, and I wanted to put it out of my creative life for a while. Since my interests have moved on to photography it seemed like a clean break was in order.

I still have the Bang Barstal comics on file as well as “It’s About Girls”, “The Halifax Explosion”, and “Yes You Can!” (Given my track record with storage devices both hard drives they’re saved on should explode any minute now) Should the day come that I feel I can have a healthy relationship (I know, sounds dumb) with what I made I might put them back online in their entirety alongside something new.

224 on Flickr.
Two shots from Seoul made into four. This was the new-to-me Pentax ME. The cold of that winter caused the shutter curtains to jam together and bend. I had just put the film in when it happened so I didn’t lose anything. I left it in one of the many trash piles you see outside of Seoul businesses (Dumpsters aren’t a thing over there because there’s really no room for the monster dump trucks we have here.) and went back down to the used camera district in Chungmuro. I walked away with the much better for me Pentax MX, which I kept for several years before selling it off in Japan in order to make some space on my self. One of the reasons I like photography is because I feel I’m getting just the right amount of reward for the effort I put into it. This is different from comics because comics take hours to create something the reader will only look at for a second. And I do get more response from them than I do from my comics which is good for an artistic medium that’s to be enjoyed by others. Also, photos are great memory kick-in-the-assers. More and more I find old comic art and going, “When did I draw that?” I have to look at them like I was in CSI to figure out when they were made. Comics destroy memory: Proven by science.

224 on Flickr.

Two shots from Seoul made into four.

This was the new-to-me Pentax ME. The cold of that winter caused the shutter curtains to jam together and bend. I had just put the film in when it happened so I didn’t lose anything. I left it in one of the many trash piles you see outside of Seoul businesses (Dumpsters aren’t a thing over there because there’s really no room for the monster dump trucks we have here.) and went back down to the used camera district in Chungmuro.

I walked away with the much better for me Pentax MX, which I kept for several years before selling it off in Japan in order to make some space on my self.

One of the reasons I like photography is because I feel I’m getting just the right amount of reward for the effort I put into it. This is different from comics because comics take hours to create something the reader will only look at for a second. And I do get more response from them than I do from my comics which is good for an artistic medium that’s to be enjoyed by others.

Also, photos are great memory kick-in-the-assers. More and more I find old comic art and going, “When did I draw that?” I have to look at them like I was in CSI to figure out when they were made.

Comics destroy memory: Proven by science.

theaudience on Flickr.
I read a couple of photoblog articles recently. They were singing the praises of a street photographer who I won’t name because, like all semi-famous folk, he has sycophants. Having dealt with that type of human before, I’d like to avoid having them threaten my family. His approach to his subject is to stick a flash and lens in a person’s face and photograph the Fight or Flight response. Art knobs call this “humanistic” because they don’t spend much time apart from other art knobs. Which I guess is true. So is photographing someone grunting away on the toilet. But this guy hangs in galleries, gets thousands of dollars for his stuff, and has people writing blog posts justifying his treating his subjects without respect because the results are, as mentioned, “humanistic”. I don’t have any of that, so you can take or leave what I write here as you see fit. I can’t use an argument from authority to convince you. But it does bring up something that I think is important to remember. If you seek to turn your creative urges into something akin to employment, you have two choices; 1. Do as you please. Have confidence that other people like it and will give you money. 2. Find out what people like and will give you money for. Change what you do to give it to them. While there are a number of people who succeed at the first, they are far outnumbered by the second. The second route is a time-tested, much more successful path than the first. You want to make money off of your creative urge, that’s the way for you to do it. That small sting you feel is just pride fucking with you. Okay, there is an alternative. Don’t bother chasing money. Do what you want simply to satisfy yourself. I think this is what you’re more likely to see in hobbyists than anything. For me, I do photography and draw comics when I feel like it for whatever reason strikes me at the time. I’m much more satisfied with what I produce as a result because I’m not killing myself chasing an illusion.  Whatever you decide to do, just don’t go around popping off flashes in people’s face. That’s assholish.

theaudience on Flickr.

I read a couple of photoblog articles recently. They were singing the praises of a street photographer who I won’t name because, like all semi-famous folk, he has sycophants. Having dealt with that type of human before, I’d like to avoid having them threaten my family.

His approach to his subject is to stick a flash and lens in a person’s face and photograph the Fight or Flight response. Art knobs call this “humanistic” because they don’t spend much time apart from other art knobs. Which I guess is true. So is photographing someone grunting away on the toilet. But this guy hangs in galleries, gets thousands of dollars for his stuff, and has people writing blog posts justifying his treating his subjects without respect because the results are, as mentioned, “humanistic”. I don’t have any of that, so you can take or leave what I write here as you see fit. I can’t use an argument from authority to convince you.

But it does bring up something that I think is important to remember. If you seek to turn your creative urges into something akin to employment, you have two choices;

1. Do as you please. Have confidence that other people like it and will give you money.

2. Find out what people like and will give you money for. Change what you do to give it to them.

While there are a number of people who succeed at the first, they are far outnumbered by the second. The second route is a time-tested, much more successful path than the first. You want to make money off of your creative urge, that’s the way for you to do it. That small sting you feel is just pride fucking with you.

Okay, there is an alternative. Don’t bother chasing money. Do what you want simply to satisfy yourself. I think this is what you’re more likely to see in hobbyists than anything. For me, I do photography and draw comics when I feel like it for whatever reason strikes me at the time. I’m much more satisfied with what I produce as a result because I’m not killing myself chasing an illusion. 

Whatever you decide to do, just don’t go around popping off flashes in people’s face. That’s assholish.